Enable browser caching

          When you visit a website, the elements on the page you visit are stored on your hard drive in a cache, or temporary storage, so the next time you visit the site, your browser can load the page without having to send another HTTP request to the server

Enabling browser caching lets you temporarily store some data on a visitors’ computer, so they don’t have to wait for it to load every time they visit your page.How long you store the data depends on their browser configuration and your server-side cache settings.

Optimize Images

          Images are one of the most common bandwidth hogs on the web.The first way to optimize your images is to scale them appropriately. Many webmasters use huge images and then scale them down with CSS. What they don’t realize is that your browser still loads them at the full image size.

For example, if you have an image that is 1000 x 1000 pixels, but you have scaled it down to 100 x 100 pixels, your browser must load ten times more than necessary. Scale your images before you upload them to your site, so you don’t ask for more from your visitors than you should.

Optimize Your CSS

CSS holds the style requirements for your page. Generally, your website accesses this information in one of two ways: in an external file, which loads before your page renders, and inline, which is inserted in the HTML document itself.

Optimized CSS means your files will download faster, giving your visitors quicker access to your pages. Extra spaces in your stylesheets increase file size. CSS minimization removes those extra spaces from your code to ensure your file is at its smallest size.

Reduce redirects

Sometimes to indicate the new location of a URL, track clicks, connect different parts of a site together or reserve multiple domains, you need to redirect the browser from one URL to another. Redirects trigger an extra HTTP request and add latency.

Never reference URLs in your pages that are known to redirect to other URLs. Your application needs to have a way of updating URL references whenever resources change their location.

Never require more than one redirect to get to a given resource. For instance, if C is the target page, and there are two different start points, A and B, both A and B should redirect directly to C; A should never redirect intermediately to B.

Reduce the number of plugins

          Too many plugins slow your site, create security issues, and often cause crashes and other technical difficulties.Deactivate and delete any unnecessary plugins. Then weed out any plugins that slow your site speed.Try selectively disabling plugins, then measuring server performance. This way you can identify any plugins that harm your site speed.

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